Billy Corben: Raw, Dangerous and Real

A post I wrote for LinkedIn
Pete Turner

Break It Down Show Host, Professional Speaker and Cultural Consultant.–What’s your “Ground Truth?”

This week’s, Break It Down Show, features one of my favorite storytellers, Director Billy Corben.  Billy and his partners at Rakontur are masters at making documentaries that rivet us.  Billy has found formulas for telling incredible stories, and opening up people who simply aren’t supposed to talk. Mix in the sexy, sweaty, coke dusted hues of SoFla and we’re all living vicariously through Billy’s subjects.  He’s made documentaries cool, sexy and dangerous.

If Ken Burns uses Tom Hanks’ voice and the souls of long dead men to grab you; Billy’s protagonist is that devil we all have on our shoulder. It’s so much fun watching his subjects pick life in the fast lane, while we wait for the train wreck that follows.  All of his movies are a flume ride, we know everyone is going to get soaked in the end, but oh what a ride.

Beyond the thrills Billy’s documentaries provide, he has a master’s touch at getting his subjects to trust him. Is there a more tightly knit group than the 500 people that live in Everglades City, FL? In, his film, “Square Grouper: The Godfather of Ganja,” Billy easily gets these people to open up and share their story. Then he makes them utterly fascinating. He creates an urge in all of us to have been in Everglades City, or in Miami back in the day.

He also successfully translates the culture of his subjects. In a way, Billy is giving us an ethnography in his films…he makes us see what it’s like to be a smuggler, a cracker, an NFL player, or most recently, a backyard bare knuckle boxer/promoter. I understand someone like DaDa 5000 and his neighbors, because Billy can show us their “ground truth.”

In his movie, Dawg Fight, DaDa 5000 is a man who organizes a group of bare knuckle brawlers who willingly enter the ring in unsanctioned fights for small purses.  The movie is best described as, raw, urban and dangerous. The movie was so real, movie studios were afraid to distribute it; that’s my kind of documentary. West Perrine, the setting, is about 20 mins from downtown Miami, and not the kind of place people with things to lose want to hang.

Yet, we’re drawn into DaDa’s world and we get why these young men fight. We watch and wait for the inevitable with our hands over our eyes. Billy reveals just how hard life is for the people of West Perrine. He illustrates how the fights unite the area. We see DaDa provide something other than despair for the community. The success of his fights even provides a path for the best to have a chance at fighting at a higher level. It may be a non-traditional path, but it’s the only one residents of West Perrine can see. They love and I love what DaDa does for his fighters…I love what Billy does for DaDa.

Billy makes us care about; West Perrine, Everglades City, a hit man and even about sexual assault. That’s someone who knows a great story and tells it without, “screwing it up.”

From a cultural aspect, the best note of Dawg Fight is DaDa preparing for a sanctioned fight. While being briefed before the weigh-in he’s pulled aside by a Florida fight official who warns DaDa that backyard fighting it illegal and dangerous. His message is clear, if the backyard fights continue, someone is going to jail, or going to get hurt. What that official doesn’t realize is, that’s always true in West Perrine; they’d call that life.  The life is what they are fighting to escape even it’s just for 3 rounds.

Thanks for what you do Billy. Your work moves all of us…and for some it moves us to do more.

Better Than a Stipend, It’s About Family

Pete Turner

Break It Down Show Host, Professional Speaker and Cultural Consultant.–What’s your “Ground Truth?”

Better Than a Stipend, It’s About Family

Jon and I posted a 2-part episode this week on, “The Break It Down Show.”  Our guest is DeVone Boggan who heads the Office of Neighborhood Safety (ONS) in Richmond Ca.  The show links are http://bit.ly/1XI9ZGJ and http://bit.ly/24psPqN

I first discovered the ONS program, on an episode of This American Life.  They used DeVone’s program to tell a larger story….and they did a great job…but I wanted to dive deeper.  Once I booked DeVone, I remember bugging Jon quite a bit about how excited I was have DeVone as a guest…DeVone blew past my high expectations.  Even better, DeVone gives the credit to his staff…but more importantly to the brave young men (fellows) who dared to do the impossible.

Why are we paying criminals?

While doing show prep, I read over a dozen articles…what troubled me were the headlines that painted the program as a simple payment to criminals to stop committing crime.

In particular, articles such as The Fiscal Time‘s  Edward Morrissey and American Thinker‘s Rick Moran focused on the stipend aspect of the program…looking at comments after the article, this tact retards productive conversation and ignores the sophistication and success of the program.  We can do better.

More than a stipend, 7 elements

A critical indicator of success for DeVone and his staff is being seen as family by the fellows.  This approach mirrors my experiences in conflict zones….and let’s be honest, young African American or Hispanic males in Richmond are living far from a stable place….what DeVone has developed, works.

Here are the 7 elements of the fellowship:

  1. Meeting, face-to-face with fellows daily, mentoring etc.–in essence becoming part of their life
  2. Having the fellows create a life map–Their plan is coupled with all the appropriate social services available to support “THEIR!” plan, not one designed for them.
  3. More than a plan, a partner to walk it with you, hold you accountable, be there when you want to fail. –Like family would
  4. However well they perform on their plan and fellowship requirements.– BTW, most fellows don’t get paid the full amount–Accountability!!!
  5. Travel, this elements puts rival next to rival on a trip as far as S. Africa.–Traveling as family, makes rivals brothers.
  6. Mentors from outside their sphere, but within their city.–Established elders who provide the long view
  7. The fellows are put into an internship suited to their plan.–Just like an emerging young adult.

Again, we can do better, but we need guys like DeVone to ignore the machine, get on the street and start talking to the people with the problems.

Epilogue

The program has a fabulous record of success. and the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation thinks so too.  They are funding a national level program called advanced peace.

Give the show a listen, let DeVone show you his passion…and let’s make a difference where it’s so desperately needed.

With Nite Train Bombing the Green Zone

A post I wrote for LinkedIn
Pete Turner

Pete Turner

Break It Down Show Host, Professional Speaker and Cultural Consultant.–What’s your “Ground Truth?”

Everyone is working to create, “partner capacity.” If we are on our game, we are advising and assisting our partners with the intent of improving their condition. This means service members are constantly engaging with local nations through interpreters.

Given that interpreters are a critical node….and considering that we’ve been at “war” for 15 years…it seems that we’d have a professional level capacity for working with and through interpreters…we don’t.

We don’t get this right in the civilian world either.  I’ve trained dozens of professionals that work with and through interpreters.  These professionals say, they figured out how things worked on their own.  Further, they agree that their ability to achieve was compromised.  Finally, most of them note that they should have received better training before they ever began engaging foreign partners. These skills matter and directly impact your business…the same holds true for our military.

The training we receive in the military isn’t better, at best it’s outdated and pedestrian. If, and it’s not a certainty, if a service member receives training on using a translator, the class lacks any depth, nor is there a standard.  The main point of the training focuses on avoiding being tricked or deceived by your interpreter.  While detecting deception is an important consideration; it’s the wrong orientation-a nod to my J Boyd people.  Unfortunately, the training doesn’t discuss how to create a positive relationship or rapport with your interpreter.  Frankly, we treat interpreters like shit.

Why does this matter?

In modern combat, interpreters are massive force multipliers. Further, when they are not used to their fullest potential, units fail.  I can say with confidence that our level of “success” in both Iraq and Afghanistan correlates directly to our inability to leverage interpreters to their potential.

Interpreters are much more than mouthpieces. Their native level understanding of language, culture, religion and social norms are invaluable and something no service members can replicate on their own.  I like to say, “You can’t out Iraq an Iraqi.”  Whether in combat or in business, we can all learn a lot from Nite Train.

Head over to www.breakitdownshow.com and check out our show with my man Nite Train…he gives us real insight into what it means to support a unit at the highest level…and how fleeting success and stability remain.